Home
Archives
«Prev || 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 || Next»
Posted by: Benjamin
Ezra HaLevi, and the people and organizations quoted on Israeli National News, are in no way associated with peshat.com and views expressed here.

BREAKING NEWS

On returning your right to attach fringe (tzi-tzi's) containing blue strands to your four cornered garments...

Israeli National News
24 Adar Bet 5768, March 31, '08

Hebrew Garments and the Restoration of Biblical Blue
by Ezra HaLevi

(IsraelNN.com) After three days of Purim, Jerusalemites young and old came out of one more night of revelry as Tuesday Night Live focused on Biblical Jewish fashion.

The evening featured Reuven Prager, who pioneered a movement of producing Beged Ivri (Hebrew garb) for Jews who have returned to the Land of Israel, as well as Dr. Ari Greenspan, who has reintroduced the Biblical blue tekhelet dye, used to fulfill the mitzvah (commandment) of tzitzit (fringes placed on four-cornered garments).

"Ever since 135 CE, when Hadrian forbade, under death, the wearing of tzitzit, we have attached our tzitzit to a little garment hidden beneath our gentile attire," Prager told hosts Ari Abramowitz and Jeremy Gimpel. "It became just a zecher (a remembrance)," he said, emphasizing that now that the Jewish people are a sovereign nation in the Land of Israel it behooves us not only to dress like it, but to return to the full observance of the Biblical laws governing Jewish dress.

Who is Hadrian and under what authority did he forbid the wearing of tzi-tzi's -- a command of YHWH's?

From Wikipedia: Hadrian, "Publius Aelius Traianus Hadrianus (January 24, 76 - July 10, 138 ), known as Hadrian in English, was emperor of Rome from 117 to 138 AD."


Numbers Chapter 15
37 And YHWH spoke unto Moses, saying:
38 'Speak unto the children of Israel, and bid them that they make them throughout their generations fringes in the corners of their garments, and that they put with the fringe of each corner a thread of blue.
39 And it shall be unto you for a fringe, that ye may look upon it, and remember all the commandments of YHWH, and do them; and that ye go not about after your own heart and your own eyes, after which ye use to go astray;
40 that ye may remember and do all My commandments, and be holy unto your God.
41 I am YHWH your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, to be your God: I am YHWH your God.'

"A garment is something that you put on when you go outside to protect you from the elements or for the sake of modesty," he explained. "Every Jews would wear a haluk - which our neighbors and cousins, who still wear them, call a jalabiya. It was the Middle Eastern undergarment. An Israelite could be distinguished by his tallit."

» Read More

03/04/08: The Shabbat Goy

Posted by: Benjamin
From Jewish Encyclopedia.com: Shabbat Goy

SHABBAT GOY:
By : Joseph Jacobs Judah David Eisenstein

The Gentile employed in a Jewish household on the Sabbath-day to perform services which are religiously forbidden to Jews on that day. The Shabbat goy's duty is to extinguish the lighted candles or lamps on Friday night, and make a fire in the oven or stove on Sabbath mornings during the cold weather. A poor woman ("Shabbat goyah") often discharges these offices. The hire in olden times was a piece of ḥallah; in modern times, about 10 cents.

Both employing a goy and having candles lit on Shabbat are questionable. Approximately 18 minutes prior to Shabbat, Rabbinical Jews have made it a woman's duty to light candles while reciting the following "blessing":

From http://www.chabad.org:
"Blessed are you, L‑rd our G‑d, King of the universe, who has sanctified us with His commandments, and commanded us to kindle the light of the Holy Shabbat."
The logical conclusion is this prayer is directed to a god who commanded you to light the candles of Shabbat. Assuming it is acceptable to have fire kindled leading into Shabbat... this blessing is still, at best, incredibly misleading since it specifically excludes YHWH as the blessing's benefactor. We are, in fact, commanded by YHWH not to kindle fire on shabbat.

From http://www.shabbatcandlesticks.com/:
Actually, a search for the reason for lighting Shabbat candlesticks reveals an interesting history behind it. In fact, there is no commandment in the Torah to light Shabbat candles. The tradition of lighting Shabbat candlesticks derives from a much later period in Jewish history ... The rabbis, in order to make their point clearly, and to solidify the authority of rabbinic law throughout the Jewish community, instituted the recitation of a berakhah when lighting Shabbat candlesticks, thus implying that it is a commandment with the force of Torah behind it.
If a commandment did exist to light the candles, candles would then be lit every week without fail since it would be sinning not to light candles -- it would not be tradition. Since YHWH did not make such a commandment based on Deu 4:2 (not to add to or subtract from Torah) and Joshua 8:34 (stating that no commandments exist outside the written Torah), you could say the tradition of praying to a god who commanded it is clearly an idolatrous practice. It should concern everyone.


Deuteronomy Chapter 4
2 Ye shall not add unto the word which I command you, neither shall ye diminish from it, that ye may keep the commandments of YHWH your God which I command you.
3 Your eyes have seen what YHWH did in Baal-peor; for all the men that followed the Baal of Peor, YHWH thy God hath destroyed them from the midst of thee.

Exodus Chapter 35
2 Six days shall work be done, but on the seventh day there shall be to you a holy day, a sabbath of solemn rest to YHWH; whosoever doeth any work therein shall be put to death.
3 Ye shall kindle no fire throughout your habitations upon the sabbath day.'

Joshua Chapter 8
34 And afterward he read all the words of the law, the blessing and the curse, according to all that is written in the book of the law.
35 There was not a word of all that Moses commanded, which Joshua read not before all the assembly of Israel, and the women, and the little ones, and the strangers that walked among them.

According to strict Jewish law, a Jew is not allowed to employ a non-Jew to do work on the Sabbath which is forbidden to a Jew. The rule of the Rabbis is "amirah le-goy shebut" (i.e., "to bid a Gentile to perform work on the Sabbath is still a breach of the Sabbath law," though not so flagrant as performing the work oneself); but under certain circumstances the Rabbis allowed the employment of non-Jews, especially to heat the oven on winter days in northern countries.

» Read More

Posted by: Benjamin
The Virtual Beit Midrash, and the people and organizations quoted on http://www.vbm-torah.org, are in no way associated with peshat.com and views expressed here.

YESHIVAT HAR ETZION
ISRAEL KOSCHITZKY VIRTUAL BEIT MIDRASH (VBM)
*********************************************************

INTRODUCTION TO PARASHAT HASHAVUA
PARASHAT VAERA

The Exodus - "Peshat" and "Derash"
by Rav David Silverberg


I. Introduction

Parashat Vaera focuses on the ten "makkot," the plagues that bring havoc and destruction upon the land of Egypt in response to Pharaoh's refusal to free the Hebrew slaves. This extended process of ten plagues reveals that God's plan involves more than His nation's freedom. If He intended solely to liberate the slaves from Pharaoh's rule, a single miraculous blow would have sufficed. But, as the Almighty Himself tells Moshe, He has an additional goal in mind, as well: "The Egyptians shall know that I am the Lord, when I stretch out My hand over Egypt and bring the Israelites from their midst" (7:5). Last week, we read of Pharaoh's defiant response to God's order to set the slaves free: "Who is God that I should heed Him and let Israel go? I do not know God, nor will I let Israel go" (5:2). The redemption process must therefore entail an exhibition of divine strength that brings the Egyptian empire to its knees.

Our shiur this week will address the question as to whether any corresponding process was necessary on Benei Yisrael's part. Did God demand anything from them to earn their freedom? Were they charged with any religious responsibilities or obligations as prerequisites for their emancipation? Much later in Tanakh, in the book of Yechezkel, we find explicit proof to the fact that God had, indeed, called upon the Hebrew slaves to repent: "When I made Myself known to them in the land of Egypt" I also said to them: cast away, every one of you, the detestable things of his eyes, and do not defile yourselves with the fetishes of Egypt" (Yechezkel 20:5,7). In the Chumash itself, however, no such explicit indication is to be found. We will try to demonstrate that the "peshat," or straightforward reading of the narrative in the book of Shemot, and the "derash," the homiletic tradition of our Sages, point us in two opposite directions. As we will see, this issue serves as a beautiful example of the interplay between these two levels of interpretation, which will hopefully enhance our appreciation for the study of peshat on the one hand, and for the brilliance and power of derash, on the other.

I must assume this is a poor choice of words - demonstrating that the "peshat" meaning and the "derash" tradition point us in two opposite directions. Let's assure the "derash" tradition does not lead one from the "peshat" understanding of the Torah.

Deuteronomy Chapter 4
1 And now, O Israel, hearken unto the statutes and unto the ordinances, which I teach you, to do them; that ye may live, and go in and possess the land which YHWH, the God of your fathers, giveth you.
2 Ye shall not add unto the word which I command you, neither shall ye diminish from it, that ye may keep the commandments of YHWH your God which I command you.

The well-known statement of the Talmud ein mikra yotze midei peshuto (Shabbat 63a; Yev. 11b, 24a) is rendered in the Soncino translation, "A verse cannot depart from its plain meaning."
- Louis Rabinowitz,
The Talmudic Meaning of Peshat
Tradition: A Journal of Orthodox Thought, 6:1, 1963.

There are two possible indications of an obligation on Benei Yisrael's part in preparation for the Exodus, one in Parashat Vaera, and another in Parashat Bo. We will study each instance and contrast the peshat approach with the homiletic interpretation.

» Read More

Posted by: Benjamin
Ami Hertz, and the people and organizations quoted on http://www.amhaaretz.org, are in no way associated with peshat.com and views expressed here.

All Torah was written down
Ami Hertz
October 23, 2004

This page is part of the book Critique of the Oral Torah.

In this chapter, I show that, contrary to Rabbinical claims about the Oral Torah, Moses wrote down all of the Torah.

1. Many passages throughout the Jewish Bible say that Moses wrote down the Torah. Here are some examples.

Moses wrote down this Teaching [ha-torah - התורה] and gave it to the priests, sons of Levi, who carried the Ark of YHWH's Covenant, and to all the elders of Israel.

Deuteronomy Chapter 31
9 And Moses wrote this law, and delivered it unto the priests the sons of Levi, that bore the ark of the covenant of YHWH, and unto all the elders of Israel.
10 And Moses commanded them, saying: 'At the end of every seven years, in the set time of the year of release, in the feast of tabernacles,
11 when all Israel is come to appear before YHWH thy God in the place which He shall choose, thou shalt read this law before all Israel in their hearing.
12 Assemble the people, the men and the women and the little ones, and thy stranger that is within thy gates, that they may hear, and that they may learn, and fear YHWH your God, and observe to do all the words of this law;
13 and that their children, who have not known, may hear, and learn to fear YHWH your God, as long as ye live in the land whither ye go over the Jordan to possess it.'

And Moses instructed them as follows: Every seventh year, the year set for remission, at the Feast of Booths, when all Israel comes to appear before YHWH your God in the place that He will choose, you shall read [tiqra - תקרא] this Teaching [ha-torah] aloud in the presence of all Israel. Gather the people - men, women, children, and the strangers in your communities - that they may hear and so learn to revere YHWH your God and to observe faithfully every word of this Teaching [divrei ha-torah - דברי התורה]. Their children, too, who have not had the experience, shall hear and learn to revere YHWH your God as long as they live in the land that you are about to cross the Jordan to possess. (Deut. 31:9-13)

This passages says that Moses wrote down the Torah. He commanded that the Torah be read every seventh year in the presence of all the people, so that the people learn to follow this Written Torah. Moses makes no mention of following another Torah, in addition to the one that he wrote down.

Deuteronomy Chapter 31
24 And it came to pass, when Moses had made an end of writing the words of this law in a book, until they were finished,
25 that Moses commanded the Levites, that bore the ark of the covenant of YHWH, saying:
26 'Take this book of the law, and put it by the side of the ark of the covenant of YHWH your God, that it may be there for a witness against thee.
27 For I know thy rebellion, and thy stiff neck; behold, while I am yet alive with you this day, ye have been rebellious against YHWH; and how much more after my death?
28 Assemble unto me all the elders of your tribes, and your officers, that I may speak these words in their ears, and call heaven and earth to witness against them.
29 For I know that after my death ye will in any wise deal corruptly, and turn aside from the way which I have commanded you; and evil will befall you in the end of days; because ye will do that which is evil in the sight of YHWH, to provoke Him through the work of your hands.'

When Moses had put down in writing the words of this Teaching [divrei ha-torah] in a book [sefer - ספר] to the very end, Moses charged the Levites who carried the Ark of the Covenant of YHWH, saying: Take this book of Teaching [sefer ha-torah] and place it beside the Ark of the Covenant of YHWH your God, and let it remain there as a witness against you. Well I know how defiant and stiffnecked you are: even now, while I am still alive in your midst, you have been defiant toward YHWH; how much more, then, when I am dead! Gather to me all the elders of your tribes and your officials, that I may speak all these words to them and that I may call heaven and earth to witness against them. For I know that, when I am dead, you will act wickedly and turn away from the path that I enjoined upon you, and that in time to come misfortune will befall you for having done evil in the sight of YHWH and vexed Him by your deeds. (Deut. 31:24-29)

» Read More

Abraham Collier is in no way associated with peshat.com.

Do Not Equate Karaism with Zionism
by Abraham Collier


Introduction

The anti-Zionist organisations such as True Torah Jews, Jews Against Zionism, and Neturei Karta are 100% correct in their assessment of Zionist history, motives, and politics. They are 100% correct in their feelings toward the State of Israel and the inherent dangers that plague all Jews, Zionist or not, because of Israel's policies and "peace" negotiations. They are 100% correct in stating that the State of Israel is a secular apostasy and pseudo democracy that is ungodly in every way.

I am writing today because I read a True Torah Jews brochure entitled, 'On This Day of Independence from Zionism' and am concerned with how the organisation quoted a Rabbanite scholar who equated the Karaites with Zionism. I disagree with this rabbi and True Torah Jew's use of this material. I am worried about the implications the quote may have in regards to the views of Jews, ****ians, Muslims, and secularists, who, regardless of their favour or dislike for Zionism, toward Karaites. There is already a significant amount of ignorance and misinformation about Karaites from orthodox Rabbanite sources and to equate us to Zionism is quite distasteful and misleading.

The Quote

"The Jewish people have suffered many plagues: the Sadducees, Karaites, Hellenisers, Shabbasai Zvi, Haskalah, Reform and many others. But the strongest of them all is Zionism." (Rabbi Chaim Soloveitchik, Mishkenos Haro'im, p. 269)

Any novice student of Jewish history recognises each of these movements as heretical in the eyes of Orthodox Rabbanite Judaism. Please note that I am not implying in favour of any of these groups, with the exception of Karaism seeing that I lean towards Karaite beliefs myself.

Deuteronomy Chapter 4
1 And now, O Israel, hearken unto the statutes and unto the ordinances, which I teach you, to do them; that ye may live, and go in and possess the land which YHWH, the God of your fathers, giveth you.
2 Ye shall not add unto the word which I command you, neither shall ye diminish from it, that ye may keep the commandments of YHWH your God which I command you.

The well-known statement of the Talmud ein mikra yotze midei peshuto (Shabbat 63a; Yev. 11b, 24a) is rendered in the Soncino translation, "A verse cannot depart from its plain meaning."
Louis Rabinowitz
The Talmudic Meaning of Peshat
Tradition: A Journal of Orthodox Thought, 6:1, 1963.

It is of necessity to remind you that the Pharisees, who are the ancestors of the Rabbanites, were the enemies of all Judaism during the Second Temple Era. Once this is understood, you will see how Rabbanite Judaism is the true plague that maladies the Jews.

The Pharisee and Sadducee Controversy

When one studies the Second Temple Era, they are usually overwhelmed by the contradictions, obscurities, and blatant bias that many historians, philosophers, clergymen and rabbis had towards the Jews at that time. Josephus, he is probably the best source for knowledge of this period, states:

» Read More

Category: General
Posted by: Benjamin
Jews Against Zionism, and the people and organizations quoted on their site, are in no way associated with peshat.com and views expressed here.


The Central Rabbinical Congress of the U.S.A. and Canada placed a quarter-page ad in today's New York Times, affirming the opposition of hundreds of thousands of Orthodox Jews to Zionism and Jewish rule over the Holy Land during exile, and denouncing religious Zionist groups as falsifiers of the Torah. The ad appeared in the newspaper on page A-20.

The text of the ad was as follows:

A Clarification of Torah Doctrine

Consistently, throughout the peace process in the Middle East, various Jewish religious organizations and parties have raised their voices in opposition to the return of territories to the Arabs, issuing statements that, according to the Torah, Jews are forbidden to give up any land in the Holy Land (especially part of Jerusalem).

Land sold returns to the original owner on the Year of Return - Jubilee. The timing of the next Jubilee year appears to be debatable.

Leviticus Chapter 27
24 In the year of jubilee the field shall return unto him of whom it was bought, even to him to whom the possession of the land belongeth.

Accordingly, it has become a commonplace that religious Jews are supportive of stopping the peace process. In the public mind, the policies of these parties became synonymous with Torah Doctrine. Moreover, they are portrayed in the media as "ultra-nationalists" willing to exchange "peace" for "land".

This impression is utterly false. All forms of Zionism, be they secular or religious, are inherently antithetical to the teaching of our faith! The great sages and saints of our people have always been opposed to the existence of the Zionist State. Indeed, when an obscure Viennese journalist first challenged the Torah approach to exile and redemption, over one hundred years ago, he was immediately attacked by the Torah sages of that time. Those orthodox Jews who support the Israeli state and "Greater Israel" are falsifiers of Torah doctrine. They have abandoned the principles of their predecessors.

» Read More

Posted by: Benjamin
Coming soon...



Yahoo Questions: Best Answer

"The older compilation is called the Jerusalem Talmud or the Talmud Yerushalmi. It was compiled sometime during the fourth century in Palestine. The Babylonian Talmud was compiled about the year 500 C.E., although it continued to be edited later"
-- Muhammed K

"They are 2 separate works, created respectively in Babylon and in the Holy Land by different people, so they are quite different in content, despite being commentary on the same Mishnah.
The one that is followed is the Babylonian talmud, that is considered the main book of authority for all diasporas, due to its thorough editing and the greater influence of the Babylonian wise men at that time."
-- Mama

Job Chapter 4
16 It stood still, but I could not discern the appearance thereof; a form was before mine eyes; I heard a still voice:
17 'Shall mortal man be just before God? Shall a man be pure before his Maker?
18 Behold, He putteth no trust in His servants, and His angels He chargeth with folly;
19 How much more them that dwell in houses of clay, whose foundation is in the dust, who are crushed before the moth!
20 Betwixt morning and evening they are shattered; they perish for ever without any regarding it.
21 Is not their tent-cord plucked up within them? They die, and that without wisdom.'


Exodus Chapter 23
1 Thou shalt not utter a false report; put not thy hand with the wicked to be an unrighteous witness.
2 Thou shalt not follow a multitude to do evil; neither shalt thou bear witness in a cause to turn aside after a multitude to pervert justice;
3 neither shalt thou favour a poor man in his cause.

» Read More

«Prev || 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 || Next»


Buy me a coffee ($3)